2012-01-26 / Front Page

Log truck rolls, blocks Route 9

BY DARCIE MOORE Times Record Staff


MAINE STATE POLICE officers look over a smashed logging truck at the intersection of Swamp Road, Newell Brook Road and Plummer Mill Road in Durham on Wednesday morning. The treacherous stretch of roadway is known locally as Dead Man’s Corner. 
TROY R. BENNETT / THE TIMES RECORD MAINE STATE POLICE officers look over a smashed logging truck at the intersection of Swamp Road, Newell Brook Road and Plummer Mill Road in Durham on Wednesday morning. The treacherous stretch of roadway is known locally as Dead Man’s Corner. TROY R. BENNETT / THE TIMES RECORD DURHAM — The driver of a logging truck that rolled over Wednesday morning on Route 9 was in good condition at a Lewiston hospital that afternoon, after crews spent about five hours cleaning up the crash scene.

Douglas Goucher, 48, of Wayne, lost control of the logging truck he was driving Wednesday morning, according to a press release from Maine State Trooper Elgin Physic. Durham Rescue transported Goucher to Central Maine Medical Center for complaints of pain. He was listed in good condition Wednesday afternoon by a hospital spokesman.

The truck, owned by Ted Goucher and Son Forest Products Inc., overturned at the intersection of Route 9 and Swamp Road.

According to Physic, speed caused the crash, which was reported at 9:47 a.m.

Police closed Route 9 to traffic for about four hours to allow crews to deal with the damaged truck and the logs it spewed onto the roadway and nearby property. As of Wednesday night, no charges had been issued.

Durham Fire Chief Bill St. Michel said the truck tipped near a sharp 90-degree turn heading downhill on Route 9, also Newell Brook Road. The Durham Fire Department sent two engines, a forestry truck and a rescue unit to the scene. St. Michel estimated that his department deployed 12 to 15 people to assist with the situation.

Durham called Lisbon for an engine for additional personnel, as well as a ladder truck in case it was needed to extricate the driver down from the truck. Firefighters also has fire apparatus on scene to assist with traffic control, detouring vehicles around the closure.

St. Michel said the logging truck had a dual trailer, meaning it was as long as a tractor-trailer truck and was not a selfloading truck. He said it appeared the truck rolled onto the passenger side and slid, coming to rest with the roof of the cab — pretty severely flattened — up against guardrails.

Firefighters didn’t have to use power tools, St. Michel said, but spent about 30 minutes extricating the driver from the truck. With the truck on its passenger side, the driver’s side of the cab was about eight feet off the ground, according to St. Michel.

The truck was fully loaded at the time of the rollover, St. Michel said. Some of the logs spilled into the roadway and some went down over the bank toward a brook, leaving about half of the load still on the truck.

Two wreckers were called. Initially, they couldn’t pull the truck upright while it still had logs aboard, so a pulp truck with a log loader was used to collect the rest of the logs on the truck and the spilled logs — two or three loads’ worth, St. Michel said.

Durham’s public works crew was called to bring sand to clean up some antifreeze that spilled. St. Michel didn’t think the truck’s fuel tanks punctured and said there was minimal fuel spill.

dmoore@timesrecord.com

 

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